Editor Q&A Session: Joachim Piprek

CRC Press is pleased to share with you our editor Q&A session with Joachim Piprek, editor of Handbook of Optoelectronic Device Modeling and Simulation (Two-Volume Set).

Joachim Piprek received his Ph.D. degree in theoretical physics from Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany, in 1986. For more than two decades, he worked in industry and academia on modeling, simulation, and analysis of various optoelectronic devices. Dr. Piprek has taught graduate courses at universities in Germany, Sweden, and in the United States. He was invited guest editor for several journal issues on optoelectronic device simulation and currently serves as an executive editor of Optical and Quantum Electronics as well as an associate editor for the Journal of Computational Electronics. Dr. Piprek is founder and co-chair of the annual conference on Numerical Simulation of Optoelectronic Devices and he has also (co-)chaired several SPIE conferences. He has published 3 books, 6 book chapters, 4 patents, and more than 200 research papers.

Click here to download a free chapter from Handbook of Optoelectronic Device Modeling and Simulation (Two-Volume Set).

Q&A with Joachim Piprek

 

Congratulations on the publication of your book, Handbook of Optoelectronic Device Modeling & Simulation, 2-volume set. What do you want your audience to take away from the book?

Modelling and simulation of optoelectronic devices is a diverse and demanding field. If done correctly, it can be quite beneficial for the future development of such devices.

What inspired you to write this book?

Actually, Taylor & Francis discovered the need for such handbook and I am grateful that they invited me to serve as editor.

What first attracted you to Optics and Optoelectronics as an area of study?
My first job after my Ph.D. was with a laser manufacturing company and I discovered the great need for theoretical models that are able to support the practical development of these sophisticated devices.

What audience did you have in mind whilst writing you book?

Researchers and engineers developing semiconductor optoelectronic devices, e.g., for optical communication, optical data storage, display technology, solid-state lighting, and high-power laser applications.

What makes your book stand out from its competitors?

To my knowledge, this is the first handbook on this topic, so there are no competing books, I think.

Is there one piece of research included in the book which surprised you or challenged your previous understanding of the topic?

The chapters on organic materials illustrate the great challenges involved in modelling these novel devices.

What did you enjoy about writing the book?

Working together with more than 50 chapter authors from all over the world who are top experts in their field. I learned a lot myself by editing these chapters and I think that bundling all their knowledge produced a valuable handbook.

What is your academic background?

I received my Diploma and Doctoral degrees in physics from the Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany. For more than two decades, I worked on modeling, simulation, and analysis of optoelectronic devices and taught various graduate courses at universities in Germany, Sweden, and in the United States. I also served as guest editor for several journal issues on optoelectronic device simulation and I am currently an executive/associate editor of two research journals in this field.

What is innovative about your research?

Early in my career I discovered a significant gap between theoreticians and experimentalists who often have problems understanding each other. I made it my goal to bridge this gap and found numerical simulation to be a great tool because it is able to connect our theoretical knowledge quantitatively to experimental results.

What do you think are your most significant research accomplishments?

Thus far, I published three books, six book chapters, and about 250 research papers which have received more than 6000 citations. My most cited papers are in solid-state lighting, especially on GaN-based light-emitting devices.

What advice would you give to an aspiring researcher in your field?

Keep your feet on the ground by always comparing simulations and experiments. Computer simulations create a virtual reality in which many unreal things can happen if incorrect models or parameters are used.

What do you feel has been a highlight for you, in your career?

I have been organizing the annual international conference on Numerical Simulation of Optoelectronic Devices (NUSOD) since 2001. Every year, the NUSOD conference brings together students and experts from all over the world and it provides great inspiration for future research, I think.

What do you see yourself doing in ten years' time?

Gardening and enjoying my retirement.

And finally...

Click on the link to view my web page: http://www.nusod.org/piprek/

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