John Levesque is the Director of the Cray’s Supercomputer Center of Excellence based at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He is responsible for the group performing application porting and optimization for break-through science projects. Levesque has been in High Performance computing for over 40 years. Levesque is also a member of Cray’s Chief Technology Office, heading the company’s efforts in application performance. ORNL was the first site to install a Petaflop Cray XT5 system, Jaguar; as of June 2010, it is the fastest computer in the world according to the TOP500 list and in October 2012 they will install the largest hybrid system consisting of Nvidia Kepler GPUs which has a chance of being number one again.

Before joining Cray Inc., Levesque was the Director of the Advanced Computing Technology Center at IBM Research in Yorktown Heights, New York. At IBM Research, he headed a group focusing HPC expertise within the company, and supplying users with application porting and optimization solutions for IBM SP hardware.

Previous to IBM, Levesque ran Applied Parallel Research (APR), a small California software company, which developed tools for parallelizing applications. In addition, the company completed several High Performance computing software development contracts, both for the government and industry vendors. While at APR, and previously while working for Pacific Sierra Research, Levesque headed a team jointly developing the first and currently, only “Whole Program Analysis” package for Fortran 77, called FORGE.

His early experience with High Performance computing began with optimizing nuclear effects applications for several research organizations.

Levesque is well known as a lecturer and author within the Scientific and Technical Computing community. CRC recently published his new book “High Performance Computing – Programming and Applications”.

He holds a double Masters degree in Mathematics and Physics from the University of New Mexico at Albuquerque.
Education
Double Masters degree in Mathematics and Physics from the University of New Mexico at Albuquerque