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St Andrews Studies in Reformation History


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The French Religious Wars in English Print Culture, 1570–1610

The French Religious Wars in English Print Culture, 1570–1610

Marie-Céline Daniel
September 30, 2017

Between 1570 and 1610, numerous printed works published in London testify to the anxieties and aspirations of the Elizabethans regarding France and its ongoing wars of religion. By looking at the output of such material, this book reveals the ways in which the English authorities became aware of...

The Correspondence of Reginald Pole: Volume 1 A Calendar, 1518–1546: Beginnings to Legate of Viterbo

The Correspondence of Reginald Pole: Volume 1 A Calendar, 1518–1546: Beginnings to Legate of Viterbo

Thomas F. Mayer
July 05, 2017

Reginald Pole (1500-1558), cardinal and archbishop of Canterbury, was at the centre of reform controversies in the mid 16th century - antagonist of Henry VIII, a leader of the reform group in the Roman Church, and nearly elected pope (Julius III was elected in his stead). His voluminous...

Private and Domestic Devotion in Early Modern Britain

Private and Domestic Devotion in Early Modern Britain

Alec Ryrie, Jessica Martin
May 25, 2017

Scholars increasingly recognise that understanding the history of religion means understanding worship and devotion as well as doctrines and polemics. Early modern Christianity consisted of its lived experience. This collection and its companion volume (Worship and the Parish Church in Early Modern...

A King Translated: The Writings of King James VI & I and their Interpretation in the Low Countries, 1593–1603

A King Translated: The Writings of King James VI & I and their Interpretation in the Low Countries, 1593–1603

Astrid Stilma
May 22, 2017

King James is well known as the most prolific writer of all the Stuart monarchs, publishing works on numerous topics and issues. These works were widely read, not only in Scotland and England but also on the Continent, where they appeared in several translations. In this book, Dr Stilma looks both...

A Linking of Heaven and Earth: Studies in Religious and Cultural History in Honor of Carlos M.N. Eire

A Linking of Heaven and Earth: Studies in Religious and Cultural History in Honor of Carlos M.N. Eire

Scott K. Taylor, Emily Michelson
May 22, 2017

The Reformation of the sixteenth century shattered the unity of medieval Christendom, and the resulting fissures spread to the corners of the earth. No scholar of the period has done more than Carlos M.N. Eire, however, to document how much these ruptures implicated otherworldly spheres as well....

Confessional Identity in East-Central Europe

Confessional Identity in East-Central Europe

Maria Craciun, Ovidiu Ghitta
May 15, 2017

This book considers the emergence of a remarkable diversity of churches in east-central Europe between the 16th and 18th centuries, which included Catholic, Orthodox, Hussite, Lutheran, Bohemian Brethren, Calvinist, anti-Trinitarian and Greek Catholic communities. Contributors assess the...

A Translation of Roger Ascham's Apologia pro Caena Dominica (Defence of the Lord's Supper)

A Translation of Roger Ascham's Apologia pro Caena Dominica (Defence of the Lord's Supper)

Lucy Nicholas
February 28, 2017

It has been estimated that well over half of the books published during the European Reformation were in Latin, many of which have never been translated and have garnered little scholarly attention. Yet a good number of them have a direct bearing on the history of the Reformation and its actors....

Literature and the Scottish Reformation

Literature and the Scottish Reformation

David George Mullan, Crawford Gribben
December 05, 2016

Throughout the twentieth century Scottish literary studies was dominated by a critical consensus that critiqued contemporary anti-Catholic by advancing a re-reading of the Reformation. This consensus understood that Scotland's rich medieval culture had been replaced with an anti-aesthetic tyranny...

Defending Royal Supremacy and Discerning God's Will in Tudor England

Defending Royal Supremacy and Discerning God's Will in Tudor England

Daniel Eppley
December 05, 2016

Early modern governments constantly faced the challenge of reconciling their own authority with the will of God. Most acknowledged that an individual's first loyalty must be to God's law, but were understandably reluctant to allow this as an excuse to challenge their own powers where...

Reformation, Politics and Polemics: The Growth of Protestantism in East Anglian Market Towns, 1500–1610

Reformation, Politics and Polemics: The Growth of Protestantism in East Anglian Market Towns, 1500–1610

John Craig
November 11, 2016

Drawing primarily from Suffolk sources, this book explores the development and place of Protestantism in early modern society, defined as much in terms of its practice in local communities as in its more public pronouncements from those in authority. Using detailed analysis of four communities,...

Metrical Psalmody in Print and Practice: English 'Singing Psalms' and Scottish 'Psalm Buiks', c. 1547-1640

Metrical Psalmody in Print and Practice: English 'Singing Psalms' and Scottish 'Psalm Buiks', c. 1547-1640

Timothy Duguid
October 19, 2016

During the Reformation, the Book of Psalms became one of the most well-known books of the Bible. This was particularly true in Britain, where people of all ages, social classes and educational abilities memorized and sang poetic versifications of the psalms. Those written by Thomas Sternhold and...

The Singing of the Strasbourg Protestants, 1523-1541

The Singing of the Strasbourg Protestants, 1523-1541

Daniel Trocmé-Latter
March 18, 2016

Music was, in some form or another, a pastime enjoyed by all in sixteenth-century society, and a fundamental part of their lives. It was both through the use of music and partly as a result of its existence that many religious changes occurred during the Reformation. This book explores the part...

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