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Science, Technology and Culture, 1700-1945


About the Series

Science, Technology and Culture, 1700-1945 focuses on the social, cultural, industrial and economic contexts of science and technology from the ‘scientific revolution’ up to the Second World War. Publishing lively, original, innovative research across a broad spectrum of subjects and genres by an international list of authors, the series has a global compass that concerns the development of modern science in all regions of the world. Subjects may range from close studies of particular sciences and problems to cultural and social histories of science, technology and biomedicine; accounts of scientific travel and exploration; transnational histories of scientific and technological change; monographs examining instruments, their makers and users; the material and visual cultures of science; contextual studies of institutions and of individual scientists, engineers and popularizers of science; and well-edited volumes of essays on themes in the field.

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W.J.M. Rankine, 1820–1872: The Making of Engineering Science in Victorian Culture

W.J.M. Rankine, 1820–1872: The Making of Engineering Science in Victorian Culture

Forthcoming

Ben Marsden
May 31, 2018

William John Macquorn Rankine (1820-1872) is a major figure in the history of nineteenth-century science and engineering. As well as being a successful railway and hydraulic engineer, he was largely responsible for the establishment of 'engineering science' as the core of a new academic discipline...

Brainwaves: A Cultural History of Electroencephalography

Brainwaves: A Cultural History of Electroencephalography

Forthcoming

Cornelius Borck
January 12, 2018

In the history of brain research, the prospect of visualizing brain processes has continually awakened great expectations. In this study, Cornelius Borck focuses on a recording technique developed by the German physiologist Hans Berger to register electric brain currents; a technique that was...

Barcelona: An Urban History of Science and Modernity, 1888–1929

Barcelona: An Urban History of Science and Modernity, 1888–1929

Oliver Hochadel, Agustí Nieto-Galan
October 23, 2017

The four decades between the two Universal Exhibitions of 1888 and 1929 were formative in the creation of modern Barcelona. Architecture and art blossomed in the work of Antoni Gaudi­ and many others. At the same time, social unrest tore the city apart. Topics such as art nouveau and anarchism...

Pursuing the Unity of Science: Ideology and Scientific Practice from the Great War to the Cold War

Pursuing the Unity of Science: Ideology and Scientific Practice from the Great War to the Cold War

Harmke Kamminga, Geert Somsen
October 13, 2017

From 1918 to the late 1940s, a host of influential scientists and intellectuals in Europe and North America were engaged in a number of far-reaching unity of science projects. In this period of deep social and political divisions, scientists collaborated to unify sciences across disciplinary...

John Herschel's Cape Voyage: Private Science, Public Imagination and the Ambitions of Empire

John Herschel's Cape Voyage: Private Science, Public Imagination and the Ambitions of Empire

Steven Ruskin
September 14, 2017

In 1833 John Herschel sailed from London to Cape Town, southern Africa, to undertake (at his own expense) an astronomical exploration of the southern heavens, as well as a terrestrial exploration of the area around Cape Town. After his return to England in 1838, and as a result of his voyage, he...

Entrepreneurial Ventures in Chemistry: The Muspratts of Liverpool, 1793-1934

Entrepreneurial Ventures in Chemistry: The Muspratts of Liverpool, 1793-1934

Peter Reed
June 14, 2017

The Muspratt family form a fascinating dynasty in the history of British commerce and manufacturing. Associated principally with the development of the chemical industry in Liverpool - James Muspratt (1793-1884) was the first person to make alkali on a large scale using the Leblanc Process - the...

Sir James Dewar, 1842–1923: A Ruthless Chemist

Sir James Dewar, 1842–1923: A Ruthless Chemist

J.S. Rowlinson
May 25, 2017

Sir James Dewar was a major figure in British chemistry for around 40 years. He held the posts of Jacksonian Professor of Natural Philosophy at Cambridge (1875-1923) and Fullerian Professor of Chemistry at the Royal Institution (1877-1923) and is remembered principally for his efforts to liquefy...

Phrenology and the Origins of Victorian Scientific Naturalism

Phrenology and the Origins of Victorian Scientific Naturalism

John van Wyhe
March 06, 2017

Through a reassessment of phrenology, Phrenology and the Origins of Victorian Scientific Naturalism sheds light on all kinds of works in Victorian Britain and America which have previously been unnoticed or were simply referred to with a vague 'naturalism of the times' explanation. It is often...

Discovering Water: James Watt, Henry Cavendish and the Nineteenth-Century 'Water Controversy'

Discovering Water: James Watt, Henry Cavendish and the Nineteenth-Century 'Water Controversy'

David Philip Miller
March 06, 2017

The 'water controversy' concerns one of the central discoveries of modern science, that water is not an element but rather a compound. The allocation of priority in this discovery was contentious in the 1780s and has occupied a number of 20th century historians. The matter is tied up with the...

Chemical Structure, Spatial Arrangement: The Early History of Stereochemistry, 1874–1914

Chemical Structure, Spatial Arrangement: The Early History of Stereochemistry, 1874–1914

Peter J. Ramberg
March 06, 2017

Offering a comprehensive narrative of the early history of stereochemistry, Dr Ramberg explores the reasons for and the consequences of the fundamental change in the meaning of chemical formulas with the emergence of stereochemistry during the last quarter of the nineteenth century. As yet...

Science and Beliefs: From Natural Philosophy to Natural Science, 1700–1900

Science and Beliefs: From Natural Philosophy to Natural Science, 1700–1900

Matthew D. Eddy, David M. Knight
March 06, 2017

The years between 1700 and 1900 witnessed a fundamental transition in attitudes towards science, as earlier concepts of natural philosophy were replaced with a more modern conception of science. This process was by no means a simple progression, and the changing attitudes to science was marked by...

Jesse Ramsden (1735–1800): London's Leading Scientific Instrument Maker

Jesse Ramsden (1735–1800): London's Leading Scientific Instrument Maker

Anita McConnell
November 28, 2016

Jesse Ramsden was one of the most prominent manufacturers of scientific instruments in the latter half of the eighteenth century. To own a Ramsden instrument, be it one of his great theodolites or one of the many sextants and barometers produced at his London workshop, was to own not only an...

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