Losing One's Head in the Ancient Near East: Interpretation and Meaning of Decapitation

Rita Dolce

© 2018 - Routledge
Published December 20, 2017
Reference - 92 Pages
ISBN 9781138067486 - CAT# Y332305
Series: Studies in the History of the Ancient Near East

For Instructors Request Inspection Copy

was $140.00

USD$112.00

SAVE ~$28.00

Add to Wish List
FREE Standard Shipping!

Features

  • translated from very successful and popular Italian version
  • first book in English to cover this topic
  • Ancient Near East is a popular topic at the moment
  • Summary

    In the Ancient Near East, cutting off someone’s head was a unique act, not comparable to other types of mutilation, and therefore charged with a special symbolic and communicative significance. This book examines representations of decapitation in both images and texts, particularly in the context of war, from a trans-chronological perspective that aims to shed light on some of the conditions, relationships and meanings of this specific act. The severed head is a “coveted object” for the many individuals who interact with it and determine its fate, and the act itself appears to take on the hallmarks of a ritual. Drawing mainly on the evidence from Anatolia, Syria and Mesopotamia between the third and first millennia BC, and with reference to examples from prehistory to the Neo-Assyrian Period, this fascinating study will be of interest not only to art historians, but to anyone interested in the dynamics of war in the ancient world.

    Instructors

    We provide complimentary e-inspection copies of primary textbooks to instructors considering our books for course adoption.

    Request an
    e-inspection copy

    Share this Title