Economic and Financial Analysis for Criminal Justice Organizations

Daniel Adrian Doss, William H. Sumrall III, David H. McElreath, Don W. Jones

October 28, 2013 by CRC Press
Textbook - 754 Pages - 283 B/W Illustrations
ISBN 9781466592063 - CAT# K20544

USD$162.95

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Features

    • Provides concrete methods to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of criminal justice organizations
    • Demonstrates how to make budgeting and investing decisions using multiple financial and economic models
    • Uses spreadsheets with Excel and Linux Calc to show a step-by-step method of solving problems
    • Discusses a variety of topics ranging from leasing/purchasing analysis to probability/statistics
    • Covers for-profit and non-profit organizations

Summary

From small law offices to federal agencies, all entities within the justice system are governed by complicated economic factors and face daily financial decision-making. A complement to Strategic Finance for Criminal Justice Organizations, this volume considers the justice system from a variety of economic and financial perspectives and introduces quantitative methods designed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of organizations in both the non-profit and for-profit sectors.

Using only a minimum of theory, Economic and Financial Analysis for Criminal Justice Organizations demonstrates how to make decisions in the justice system using multiple financial and economic models. Designed for readers with little knowledge of advanced mathematics, quantitative analysis, or spreadsheets, the book presents examples using straightforward, step-by-step processes with Excel and Linux Calc spreadsheet software.

A variety of different types of decisions are considered, ranging from municipal bond issuance and valuation necessary for public revenues, pension planning, capital investment, determining the best use of monies toward construction projects, and other resource planning, allocation, and forecasting issues.

From municipalities and police departments to for-profit prisons and security firms, the quantitative methods presented are designed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of all organizations in the justice domain.