Cytokines: Stress and Immunity, Second Edition

Robert E. Faith, Anthony J. Murgo, Robert A. Good, Nicholas P. Plotnikoff

October 10, 2006 by CRC Press
Reference - 405 Pages - 37 B/W Illustrations
ISBN 9780849320743 - CAT# 2074

USD$154.95

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Features

  • Details all clinically relevant cytokines, including interleukins, interferons, enkephalins, and endorphins
  • Explores cytokine-hormone interactions and the clinical implications of those interactions on the immune, endocrine, and central nervous systems
  • Reviews the documented behavior effects of cytokine activity
  • Considers genetic predispositions toward cytokine activity
  • Discusses the role of interferon in health and disease
  • Examines the clinical relevance of opioid-induced immonosuppression
  • Summary

    Cytokine involvement in the immune system's response to stress is now very well documented. Cytokine activity has been implicated in a variety of mental and physical diseases, and has been shown to have a significant role in fueling the vicious circle of depression and illness.

    The first edition of Cytokines: Stress and Immunity pointed out that the immune system does not stand alone, but is profoundly affected by other organ systems, especially the central nervous and the neuroendocrine systems, with cytokines being the common tool of communication. This edition continues on the trailblazing path of the original to once again present current research that informs our evolving understanding of how cytokines function and the clinical implications of cytokine activity.

    Completely rewritten by the top authorities in their fields, this volume includes 16 entirely new chapters, which document dramatic new developments. It provides a comprehensive overview of the role of cytokines in the neuroendocrine and immune systems, while also addressing the interactions between these systems. It examines cytokine activity and clinical implications from a number of perspectives, including those of immunology, pharmacology, oncology, endocrinology, and psychiatry. Researchers involved with the most specific aspects of cell signaling as well clinicians dealing with the effects of immunosuppression-related diseases will find a wealth of interesting and instantly applicable information.

    This new edition begins with an extended dedication and tribute to the late Robert A. Good, the father of modern immunology. It documents the life and groundbreaking achievements of Dr. Good who served as an editor for both the former and current editions of this work.