Secret History: The Story of Cryptology

Craig P. Bauer

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March 25, 2013 by Chapman and Hall/CRC
Reference - 620 Pages - 198 B/W Illustrations
ISBN 9781466561861 - CAT# K15955
Series: Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications

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Features

  • Presents a unique combination of history and mathematics
  • Describes the interaction between cryptology and other disciplines such as music, art, literature, politics, and crime
  • Illustrates the current frontier of cryptologic research through many open problems, including unsolved ciphers
  • Includes a rich list of references in every chapter, making it easy for readers to pursue the material at an even deeper level
  • Contains more than 200 illustrations that offer an illuminating look at the subject
  • Provides hundreds of exercises, real historic ciphers to test skills, an instructor’s guide, and other supplementary material on the book’s CRC web page

Solutions manual available upon qualifying course adoption

Summary

Winner of an Outstanding Academic Title Award from CHOICE Magazine

Most available cryptology books primarily focus on either mathematics or history. Breaking this mold, Secret History: The Story of Cryptology gives a thorough yet accessible treatment of both the mathematics and history of cryptology. Requiring minimal mathematical prerequisites, the book presents the mathematics in sufficient detail and weaves the history throughout the chapters. In addition to the fascinating historical and political sides of cryptology, the author—a former Scholar-in-Residence at the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) Center for Cryptologic History—includes interesting instances of codes and ciphers in crime, literature, music, and art.

Following a mainly chronological development of concepts, the book focuses on classical cryptology in the first part. It covers Greek and Viking cryptography, the Vigenère cipher, the one-time pad, transposition ciphers, Jefferson’s cipher wheel, the Playfair cipher, ADFGX, matrix encryption, World War II cipher systems (including a detailed examination of Enigma), and many other classical methods introduced before World War II.

The second part of the book examines modern cryptology. The author looks at the work of Claude Shannon and the origin and current status of the NSA, including some of its Suite B algorithms such as elliptic curve cryptography and the Advanced Encryption Standard. He also details the controversy that surrounded the Data Encryption Standard and the early years of public key cryptography. The book not only provides the how-to of the Diffie-Hellman key exchange and RSA algorithm, but also covers many attacks on the latter. Additionally, it discusses Elgamal, digital signatures, PGP, and stream ciphers and explores future directions such as quantum cryptography and DNA computing.

With numerous real-world examples and extensive references, this book skillfully balances the historical aspects of cryptology with its mathematical details. It provides readers with a sound foundation in this dynamic field.