Lunar Regolith Simulant

Lunar Regolith Simulant

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Features

  • Provides basic information on the lunar regolith and simulants
  • Explains how simulants are produced
  • Covers the cost structure of simulants, along with current limitations
  • Covers terrestrial sources of simulant components and processing technologies
  • Includes figures, photographs, and charts

Summary

Written in language that non-geologists can easily understand, this book provides basic information about the lunar regolith and simulants. It explains how simulants are produced, what sources exist, and what processes are used for their production. It emphasizes the cost structure of simulants and the limitations of existing models. Chapters cover terrestrial sources of simulant components and processing technologies for production of simulants. The text supplies figures, photographs, charts, a glossary, and extensive references for further study.

Table of Contents

Introduction

Thumbnail Summary

Lunar History
Introduction
Initial Impact
Crust Generation
Impactors
Periods
Size Distribution Versus Time
Nature of an Impact
Crater Morphology
Fracturing
Melting
Shock Welding
"Recent" Processes
Micrometeorites
Solar Wind
Radiation
Generation of Agglutinates
Lack of Sorting Relative to Terrestrial Rocks

Description of Lunar Samples
Apollo Collection Tools, Curation Handlings, Surveyor III, and Soviet Luna examples
Lunar Meteorites
Post-Apollo Lunar Missions and Datasets

Terrestrial and Lunar Geological Terminology
Mineral
Glass
Rock
Agglutinates

Description of the Lunar Regolith
Introduction
The components of Lunar Regolith
Grain Size
Space Weathering
Maturity

What We Do Not Know and Probably Need to Know about Regolith Properties
About Problems Identified During Apollo
About Building and Operating an Outpost
About Utilizing the Moon’s Resources
About Basic Regolith Properties

Lunar Regolith Simulants: Feedstocks, Existing Simulants, New Methods of Preparation
Simulant Processing
Future USG
Development of LHT-3

Elements of Regolith Simulant Cost Structure
Introduction
Complex Costs, Including Development
Scale
Elements Generally Present
Synthesis
A Simple Cost Example

Figure of Merit

Editor Bio(s)

Doug Rickman is employed by NASA at the Marshall Space Flight Center. He received his doctorate at the University of Missouri, Rolla in 1981. His training and experience covers a very broad range: mineral exploration, image processing, remote sensing, software development, medical applications, and computer systems integration.