Handbook of Frauds, Scams, and Swindles: Failures of Ethics in Leadership

Serge Matulich, David M. Currie

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June 24, 2008 by CRC Press
Handbook - 416 Pages - 3 B/W Illustrations
ISBN 9781420072853 - CAT# 72854

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Features

  • Presents a variety of historical and current fraud cases from across the world
  • Reveals the warning signs of potentially fraudulent activity
  • Demonstrates common detail and patterns inherent to most scams
  • Provides on-line access to teaching notes for qualified instructors

Summary

It has been said that scammers and swindlers often display characteristics commonly attributed to good leadership. These include setting a vision, communicating it clearly, and motivating others to follow their lead. But when these skills are used by unconscionable people to satisfy greed, how can the average person recognize that foul play is afoot?

Providing a unique account of frauds throughout modern history, Handbook of Frauds, Scams, and Swindles: Failures of Ethics in Leadership compiles narratives from around the world, including a number of highly-publicized cases. Leading financial and investigative experts have authored the individual chapters, yet the book maintains a reader-friendly style. 

The result is a text that is highly engaging and most importantly, provides regulators and investigators with an understanding of the motivations and behavior common to the individuals behind these life-damaging crimes.

The book includes a wealth of stories, including famous cases such as Ponzi, ZZZZ Best, Enron, Parmalat, and Vivendi, along with lesser-known scandals involving both corporations and individuals. There is also a section on frauds perpetrated for motives other than financial rewards, including instances when the government performed experiments on humans without their knowledge or consent, as well as stories on frauds involving science and religion.

A section detailing the Arthur Anderson debacle discusses the compounding of a fraud when the supposed watchdog plays a complicit role. And recognizing that not every issue is black or white, the book also explores whether a hoax perpetrated in the name of a noble cause can ever be justified.

By reviewing the tactics used by swindlers and the motivations that turned good people crooked, investigators and others will come to recognize the red flags that accompany unscrupulous behavior. In doing so, they may well learn how to head off potential disaster.